Fantasy Football: The Musical?
Fantasy Football: The Musical?
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Sports collide with musical theater in this bromantic new musical comedy. It’s 1991, the internet is in its first stages of existence, and Adam, a 27-year-old sports fanatic, is going nowhere in life. When Adam and his ragtag group of friends turn an illegal gambling ring into the birthplace of fantasy football, they unwittingly launch a cultural phenomenon and give way to making their own fantasies a reality. As any bro would tell you, “That’s how musicals work.” An official selection of the 2009 New York Musical Theatre Festival, Fantasy Football: The Musical? is sure to score a touchdown with even the most skeptical theatergoer.


SYNOPSIS


Adam has dreams of being a famous sports announcer, quite literally (“I Love Sports”). His brother Skip, a teenage Internet whiz, wakes him up. He is late to work and his horrible boss, Mr. Bulgewater, gives him hell.

At the local bar, we meet Stoner, Adam’s college buddy, and Sarah, Adam’s college girlfriend. Both of them have been going nowhere with their dreams. Sarah is an aspiring musician but has more bark than bite. And Stoner’s dream of running a successful bar is clouded by the fact that his only regular customer is his dad. Jacko, their friend who went with a practical job as a lawyer, doesn’t exactly offer consolation.

Fed up with his job, Adam plays with the idea of calling his college rival, J-Bug, a sports writer, for a job.

Becky, a Jesus fanatic, stops by the bar to tell everyone about her upcoming Christian Music Festival. Sarah manages to convince her to book her act, in exchange for the two becoming the best of friends. Jacko is a little upset that Stoner has an obvious crush on Becky, but they manage to salvage their “bromance” (“Man Friends”).

Back at Adam’s mom’s house, Skip is rapping about his Internet skillz (“Skip Rap #1”). Adam gets a phone call from Stoner, who says he has a business opportunity. Adam lies and tells Stoner that he is working for a sports broadcasting company. Despite his impairing doubts, Adam decides that for once in his life he is going to take a risk (“Man of the House”).

As Adam reunites with his old crew at the pub, Stoner reveals a faulty plan. He wants to start an illegal gambling ring in the bar (“Nowhere To Go But Up”). Adam tweaks the idea by adding that instead of betting on real teams, you draft your own teams made up of real players and score points based on those players stats. They get to work and pound out a plan (“The 1980s Movie Montage Song”).

Adam comes home to Skip at the computer again; he might be exploring an Internet romance (“Skip Rap #2”). Adam calls his boss, making up a fake Jewish holiday, to get out of work the next day in order to attend the “draft.”

Meanwhile, Becky and Sarah are hanging out at Sarah’s apartment, (“What Girls Do When They’re Alone, or The Underwear Song”). Becky lets Sarah in on a secret; she has a crush on Stoner. Sarah immediately calls him and asks him to come over.

Back at the bar, Adam has walked in and finds himself alone. He decides that he needs to find the courage to tell Sarah that he is still in love with her (“Alcohol”).

Adam shows up at Sarah’s apartment drunk, and is shocked to find Stoner there (“It’s Not What You’re Thinking”). Before anyone can explain that Stoner was only there to try and woo Becky, Adam storms off back to the bar (“Alcohol –(Reprise)”).

The next morning, Jacko and Stoner show up to the bar and wake up Adam to fill him in on the misunderstanding. While sporting an impressive hang over, Adam and the boys start their fantasy draft (“I’ve Got First Pick/The Founding Brothers”).

Back at Adam’s mom’s house, Skip is still exploring the possibilities of cyber romance (“Skip Rap #3”). Adam’s boss, Mr. Bulgewater, calls to call out Adam’s lie about the Jewish holiday. Skip runs off to the bar to try and warn his brother.

Adam leaves the draft for a minute to find Sarah and apologize (“Sports is my Religion”). After the two let out some of their past frustrations, they kiss.

J-Bug, Adam’s rival, is in the bar to cover the gambling. He lets everyone know that Adam doesn’t actually work for a sports broadcasting company. Just as Stoner begins to freak out at Adam, a police officer enters to break up the gambling ring. Once Adam explains to the officer that they aren’t just betting on the real teams and that they have elected “fantasy” teams, the officer wants in on the gambling action.

Skip walks in to let everyone know that they can share their business with the entire world (“This Thing Called the Internet”).

Mr. Bulgewater enters with the intention of firing Adam. But once Adam explains how he really feels, Mr. Bulgewater offers to make some phone calls to some of his contacts in sports journalism, explaining, “That’s how musicals work.” Flash-forward and Adam and Sarah are together, he is a sports broadcaster and she is making music (“Everyone Needs a Fantasy (Once in a While)”).

QUOTE


Fantasy Football the Musical? scores genuine laughter!

–Backstage


SONG LIST

00:00 00:00
  1. I Love Sports
  2. Man Friends
  3. Skip Rap #1
  4. Man Of The House
  5. Nowhere To Go But Up
  6. The 1980s Movie Montage Song
  7. Skip Rap #2
  8. What Girls Do When They’re Alone
  9. Alcohol
  10. It’s Not What You’re Thinking
  11. Alcohol (Reprise)
  12. I’ve Got First Pick/The Founding Brothers
  13. Skip Rap #3
  14. Sports Is My Religion
  15. This Thing Called The Internet
  16. Everyone Needs A Fantasy (Once In A While)

Characters:

Adam Bernstein – 20s – A down-on-his-luck wannabe sports journalist. Comedic leading man. Tenor, must be strong singer.

Sarah Worscht – 20s – The tough gal waitress with dreams of making it in Hollywood. Must be strong singer and have great comedic timing.

John “Jacko” O’Flaherty – 20s – The bro-turned-lawyer whose sarcasm shows he still knows how to let loose once in a while. Baritone with a politician's presence. 

Reginald “Stoner” Stone – 20s – The lovable goofball of the group who never quite put a career together. Manages a sports bar, is way in over his head. Must be hilarious, and be able to sing a manly tenor.

Mr. Bulgewater – 40s or up – The self-important, self-made billionaire who expects greatness from his employees. Commanding presence. Ability to sing well a bonus.

Skip Bernstein – 18 – Adam's Internet-obsessed younger brother. Must be charming and adorable, have a good voice, and be a great rapper.

Becky Godbible – College student – A frenetically excited and chirpy cheerleader type who loves her religion. Comes on a bit strong, but has a great heart.

Officer Kilborn – 40s+ – The bumbling policeman who wishes he lived in a cop drama.

J-Bug – 20s – Adam's odious rival. Hated by all.

Announcers 1 and 2 – Sports announcers on TV.

1, 2, and 3 – PAs at a cable sports news show.

Cyber Chicks – Cyber-ladies from the future!

Mrs. Bulgewater – Mr. Bulgewater’s mom from the past!


Casting Note: Suggested double casting:

Sarah/PA 1/Cyber Chick

Becky/PA 2/Cyber Chick/Mrs. Bulgewater

Stoner/PA 3

Mr. Bulgewater/Kilborn/Announcer 1

Skip/J-Bug/Announcer 2 

Setting: In and around Adam’s house and the local pub, 1990s

 

David Ingber (Book, Music & Lyrics) is a writer and composer based in New York City. He collaborated with Grammy Award-winning composer Lamont Dozier on the musical adaptation of Mr. Chickee's Funny Money. He writes comedy video content for the Major League Baseball Fan Cave; his content has amassed over 35 million views. Ingber's first show, Fantasy Football: The Musical?, won the Best of Fest Audience Award at the New York Musical Theater Festival. Ingber writes a male-perspective column for Cosmopolitan magazine, and he has written for various web series, including ESPN's Mayne Street with Kenny Mayne and Microsoft's Fasterpiece Theater. Ingber serves as the resident playwright for the New York-based theater company Art Party, producing and collaborating on audience-immersion experiences around New York.

Performance Royalties are based on theater particulars. Please fill out an application for a personalized quote.

Billing responsibilities, pertinent copyright information, and playwrights' biographies are available in the show rider that comes with your license agreement. To download the show rider for Fantasy Football: The Musical?, click here.

A different kind of male bonding is what FANTASY FOOTBALL: THE MUSICAL? is all about.

"This breezy, light, just-for-fun piece is high-spirited and snappy. An interest in football is not a prerequisite to enjoy this show! The script and score score touchdowns (that’s a football term)!” –Cabaret Exchange

“Intelligent and witty… pure camp, in the best sense of the word!” –NY Theater

"It's not often that fans of Theater Talk and Monday Night Football converge, but that just might happen at Fantasy Football: The Musical?." –The New York Times

Materials: your materials will be sent to you two months prior to your opening date and will include everything necessary for your production and can be ordered in Printed or Digital format. Printed Materials are provided on unbound three-hole punched loose-leaf paper while Digital Materials are provided via email as downloadable PDF files for you to print in-house. All materials are yours to keep! No deposits, no returns.

The production materials for Fantasy Football: The Musical? include:

Production Scripts, Piano/Vocal Scores

Orchestrations: Keyboard 1 and 2, Guitar, Drums

Official Logo Pack Now Included! To help you promote your show, Stage Rights now includes a logo pack with your license. The logo pack includes high resolution versions (both color and black and white) of our professionally designed show logo. 

Optional Materials: 

Director's Script – Single-sided script with space for director’s notes.

Reference Recording – Audio recording for reference purposes only.

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